Weightlifting is great for seniors

Weight lifting for seniors

Weightlifting is great for seniors. Sarcopenia is the gradual loss of muscle mass that naturally comes with aging. According to WebMD, physical inactive people can lose 3-5% of their muscle mass each decade after turning 30. Sarcopenia starts to occur around age 65. Muscles begin to weaken which leads to falls and fractures. To avoid lost muscle mass, its critical to engage in weight lifting, also known as resistance training.

How will resistance training effect your body?*

  • Delay physiological degeneration
  • Enhance insulin sensitivity
  • Improve bone density – which is critical to minimize the deleterious impact of falls
  • Reduce body fat
  • Increase metabolism

*NASM

Researchers at the Penn State School of Medicine conducted a study on the impact resistance training has on quality of life and life expectancy. They found that “Older adults who strength trained at least twice a week had 46 percent lower odds of death for any reason than those who did not. They also had 41 percent lower odds of cardiac death and 19 percent lower odds of dying from cancer.”

Exercise caution however. A new exercise plan, especially one involving resistance training, is not something you should just jump into. While it may be a hassle, it is important to consult with your doctor or with a personal trainer like myself who focuses on senior training, to discuss what an appropriate resistance training regimen is for you.

Improving muscle mass will not only make you look and feel better, thereby improving your self-esteem, it will also give you the confidence to engage in activities you thought were beyond your physical capabilities. Together, we can develop a vision for you! Determine your physical goals, create a course to achieve them, and change your life for the better.

My name is Barry Zlotowicz and I’m a personal trainer dedicated to helping seniors. If you would like a free consultation, call me at 312-848-9783.

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